Tag Archives: Libertarian Party

Libertarian Gary Johnson Polling at 11% in Presidential Race ─ Pandemonium to Follow

Politics, as we’ve always known it, will be dead after this election cycle. It is not a question of whether the major parties break apart, but more a question of when. The margin of victory in 2016 will likely be less than the percentage of votes going to third parties, just as it has been in many state races around the country (like those in Virginia, North Carolina, and Florida).

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An Open Letter to Gay Americans

Congratulations on something that should have taken place a long time ago. Savor your victory, but let’s be honest here — you screwed up, also. You wasted over forty years supporting the Democratic Party which was, until recently, opposed to your ever attaining equality under the law. You opted for the lesser-of-two-evils position each election, and the result was that you were taken advantage of. I’m sorry you had to wait so long. It didn’t have to be this way.

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Pennsylvania Libertarians Elect New Leadership

Members of the Libertarian Party of Pennsylvania (LPPA) elected new leadership at their 2015 Annual Convention in Bridgeport on Saturday. The new team will continue to advance the LPPA’s mission of smaller government and lower taxes as the Commonwealth — and the nation — prepare for the 2016 election cycle.

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Republicans are NOT ascendant

It would be wrong to think that Republicans won big on November 4 and are now ascendant. Not very many people like Republicans. Gallup regularly samples voters’ political affiliation and those choosing the Republican Party have declined steadily to only 24 percent this year. Arguably, they have atrophied into just a minor political party.

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Third parties fighting in court as often as in the field 

Before either of these cases can be reported, it is important to understand how ballot access works in Pennsylvania. First, political organization in Pennsylvania is divided into three categories: major parties (Republican and Democratic), minor parties, and political bodies. At present there are no parties technically classified as minor. That is because such recognition is attained only when a candidate achieves a vote tally of at least two percent of the highest vote in a district in a particular year. Neither the Libertarian nor Green parties attained the votes necessary to qualify in 2012, so they are not listed as minor parties statewide. Further, there will be no third party candidates on the Pennsylvania ballot for governor this year, thus assuring that no third party can claim minor party status until 2017 at the earliest. There are some benefits to being a minor party, such as having the party name appear as one of the party affiliation options on voter registration forms, as well as having the ability to place party candidates on the ballot for special elections.

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